Medical Marijuana Update

Legal news, protests, etc.

Moderator: notsofasteddie

User avatar
notsofasteddie
Posts: 5102
Joined: Fri 1st Jul 2011 07:05 pm
Location: S.E. USA

Re: Medical Marijuana Update

Post by notsofasteddie » Sun 19th Mar 2017 08:30 pm

Weed works — and science proves why

By Emily Earlenbaugh |
March 16, 2017


Image
Cannabis extract is prepared at the Constance Therapeutics laboratory in Richmond.
Photo: By David Downs - Special To The Chronicle

You can’t blame patients and doctors for being skeptical about marijuana’s efficacy. First off, we don’t smoke any other modern medicine. And there are very few gold-standard clinical trials for marijuana. Plus, activists hype pot’s curative properties for everything under the sun.

Still, the evidence supporting the safety and efficacy of medical cannabis is plentiful (more than 20,000 studies have been completed on the topic) and the research continues to grow. And this year might be seen as a tipping point.

In a 2017 systematic review of medical studies, researchers from the National Academy of Sciences confirmed there is substantial evidence that cannabis is an effective option for many senior ailments. The landmark 395-page review by the country’s best physicians represents the most current medical conclusions on cannabis, summarizing 10,700 research studies and coming to 100 research conclusions.

Chronic pain, inflammation

The most common use of cannabis is as a pain reliever; surveys of state pot patient populations consistently show that chronic pain is the No. 1 reason people report using medical pot. The data back up the surveys as well. The NAS study reported, “There is conclusive or substantial evidence that cannabis or cannabinoids are effective for the treatment of chronic pain in adults.”

Cell, animal and human trials, as well as patient reports, all confirm cannabis’ efficacy for chronic pain relief. While the review looked at studies on many types of chronic pain (including neuropathy, arthritis, cancer pain, multiple sclerosis, musculoskeletal issues and chemotherapy-induced pain) cannabis was helpful for pain relief regardless of condition.

Cannabis’ broad efficacy is largely due to how it interacts with the “endocannabinoid system” — an electrochemical signaling system in our nerves. This system helps the human body regulate itself. The endocannabinoid system has receptors throughout the body: in the brain, connective tissues, organs, glands and immune cells. When something goes wrong, the endocannabinoid system responds. For example, when someone is injured, cannabinoids made by the body itself can be found at the injured area, decreasing activators and sensitizers in the tissue, calming immune cells to prevent pro-inflammatory substances from being released, and stabilizing the nerve cell to prevent excessive firing. These responses work to minimize pain and damage.

While endocannabinoid receptors are stimulated by the body's natural endocannabinoids, they also can be stimulated by plant-based cannabinoids, such as those found in cannabis. The main ones active in marijuana include tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). When patients use cannabis medicinally, their natural endocannabinoid system is stimulated by cannabinoids, resulting in reduced pain and inflammation.

These anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving properties make cannabis an option for ameliorating the daily suffering from common chronic pain conditions like arthritis and neuropathy, which decrease mobility and reduce quality of life.

Image
Dried cured bud, an indica strain called Cookies.
Photo: By David Downs - Special To The Chronicle

Image
Syringe of cannabis oil used to refill vape pens. Photo: By David Downs - Special To The Chronicle

Image
Purified extracts of cannabis oil for inhaling.
Photo: By David Downs - Special To The Chronicle

A safer alternative

Access to cannabis for pain management is especially important for seniors because the pharmaceutical alternatives can be deadly. Since 1999, the prescription opiate market has quadrupled in size, along with the death toll from opiate overdoses. Despite these troubling numbers, opiates are commonly prescribed for chronic pain conditions. Some studies are showing that opioids just don’t work for long-term pain management, even if people can avoid addiction issues.

Once patients start using opiates, they require increasingly larger doses to get pain relief. When safe doses no longer work, patients must live with the pain or risk overdose. Cannabis has no lethal overdose level, making it a safer alternative for patients hoping to avoid this cycle of opiate addiction. In areas where medical cannabis is legal, deaths from opiate overdoses have gone down by 25 percent, according to several peer-reviewed studies, including one in 2016 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Wide range of treatments

Beyond relief from pain and inflammation, the National Academy of Sciences also supports the use of cannabis to treat spasticity from spinal cord injuries and other disorders, as well as nausea, lack of appetite, insomnia, anxiety, symptoms of multiple sclerosis, Tourette’s syndrome and post-traumatic stress disorder.

NAS researchers were hesitant to back up the reports that cannabis is an effective treatment for some conditions, including cancer and epilepsy. The NAS also found pot to be ineffective on glaucoma, one of the original reasons patients received the drug. Still, rather than rule out cannabis’ efficacy for these conditions, NAS researchers recommended controlled clinical trials to provide more robust evidence.

While the scientific research is starting to persuade seniors to try cannabis for their medical needs, many still worry about psychoactive side effects. But you don’t have to smoke pot or get high for it to work. Cannabis has many active components, and not all affect patients in ways that cause euphoria.

Research historically focused on THC, a cannabinoid with strong medicinal properties and psychoactive effects. While THC can leave patients feeling “high,” when it’s combined with enough CBD, the psychoactive effects disappear. This type of synergistic effect is called an entourage effect and happens when multiple cannabinoids or terpenes (cannabis’ aroma molecules) are combined. With hundreds of cannabinoids and terpenes, different varieties of cannabis provide an array of effects. Because of this variety, a cannabis specialist can be helpful for directing seniors to the types of cannabis that will work best for their needs.

While more research may expand our understanding of cannabis’ potential uses, the overall results are clear: Cannabis can safely help many seniors now.

Still, an education gap exists for seniors and the doctors who treat them. Doctors note that the endocannabinoid system is not yet taught in medical school. As the research continues to show cannabis’ medical efficacy, reliable cannabis education for doctors and their patients is essential.


sfchronicle


Emily Earlenbaugh is a cannabis patient consultant and wellness researcher. She is a former teaching assistant and adjunct instructor at UC Davis. Earlenbaugh has a doctorate in philosophy of science from UC Davis.

User avatar
notsofasteddie
Posts: 5102
Joined: Fri 1st Jul 2011 07:05 pm
Location: S.E. USA

Re: Medical Marijuana Update

Post by notsofasteddie » Fri 24th Mar 2017 12:23 am

The Best Recipe for Maximizing the Medical Effects of Marijuana

CBD-only preparations lack the synergies available when marijuana's other cannabinoids and its terpenes are kept in the game.

By Phillip Smith / AlterNet
March 22, 2017

CBD (cannabidiol) is getting a lot of attention these days as the medicinal cannabinoid in marijuana. CBD-only products are all the rage in the ever-expanding medical marijuana market, and CBD-only medical marijuana laws are becoming a favorite resort of red state politicians who want to throw a sop to those clamoring for medical marijuana, but are hesitant to actually embrace the demon weed.

But is CBD the miracle molecule on its own? Or would users benefit from using preparations made from the whole pot plant? Not to knock CBD, which even by itself clearly provides succor for many people, but advocates of "whole plant medicine" make a strong case.

That case is based on the entourage effect, which posits an interactive synergy between the components of the plant, and not just the major cannabinoids, such as THC and CBC, but also the lesser-known but still therapeutically active cannabinoids, such as CBG, CBN, THC-a, and THC-v, and even the terpenoids, the molecules that make pot plants smell and taste lemony (limonene) or piney (pinene), earthy (humulene) or musky (myrcene). The entourage effect suggests that if people want to unlock the full benefits of medical marijuana, they need to be using whole plant medicine.

"CBD and THC seem to work better together. They lessen each other’s side effects," said Eloise Theisen, RN, MSN, director of the American Cannabis Nurses Association.

"CBD has value, but its value can be enhanced with the whole plant and we can develop more individualized medicine," said Mary Lynn Mathre, RN, MSN, and president and co-founder of Patients Out of Time.

And again, it's not just the cannabinoids.

"THC seems to potentiate all the effects of CBD and conversely, CBD affects THC," explained Dr. Perry Solomon, chief medical officer for HelloMD. "Dr. Ethan Russo further supports this theory by demonstrating that non-cannabinoid plant components such as terpenes serve as inhibitors to THC’s intoxicating effects, thereby increasing THC’s therapeutic index. This ‘phytocannabinoid-terpenoid synergy,’ as Russo calls it, increases the potential of cannabis-based medicinal extracts to treat pain, inflammation, fungal and bacterial infections, depression, anxiety, addiction, epilepsy, and even cancer," he said.

"Terpenes act on receptors and neurotransmitters; they are prone to combine with or dissolve in lipids or fats; they act as serotonin uptake inhibitors (similar to antidepressants like Prozac); they enhance norepinephrine activity (similar to tricyclic antidepressants like Elavil); they increase dopamine activity; and they augment GABA (the 'downer' neurotransmitter that counters glutamate, the 'upper')," Solomon continued.

The entourage effect makes whole plant medicine the preferred means of ingesting therapeutic marijuana, the trio agreed.

"I think that any whole plant medicine is more effective than any CBD-only product," said Solomon.

"Whole plant medicine is the only way to go," echoed Theisen.

"It's safer and more effective, and tolerance will develop more slowly—if at all," Mathre concurred.

The traditional method of consuming whole plant marijuana has been to smoke it, but that's not an especially favored route among medical marijuana advocates. And there are other options.

"Vaporization or tinctures of whole plants. Any sort of extraction method that isn’t going to deplete it," said Theisen.

"Delivery methods vary greatly in terms of their efficiency and their effects. I heard a colleague say that smoking a joint for therapeutic effect is akin to opening your mouth in the rain to get a drink of water," said Constance Finley, founder and CEO of Constance Therapeutics. "Our preferred methods are buccal (cheek) ingestion or sublingual ingestion, vaping from a vaporizer or vape pen whose hardware is safe to use with cannabis extracts, and topical for additional localized impact."

With whole plant superior to single-cannabinoid preparations, people living in states that have only passed CBD-only laws are not able to enjoy the full benefits of medical marijuana. That's a damned shame, said an exasperated Mathre.

"We have lawyers and politicians practicing medicine without a license—they don’t know what they are talking about," she said. "Clearly there may be some patients who need little to no THC, but the vast majority will benefit from it. Patients should have all of the options open to them and research needs to continue to help determine how to best individualize cannabis medicine."


AlterNet




Phillip Smith is editor of the AlterNet Drug Reporter and author of the Drug War Chronicle.

User avatar
notsofasteddie
Posts: 5102
Joined: Fri 1st Jul 2011 07:05 pm
Location: S.E. USA

Re: Medical Marijuana Update

Post by notsofasteddie » Sat 25th Mar 2017 12:39 pm

Medical Marijuana Update


by psmith,
March 22, 2017

Image

Busy, busy. Lawmakers in Arkansas and North Dakota try to "fix" medical marijuana initiatives, New York chronic pain patients can now use medical marijuana, a CBD compromise is reached in Georgia, and more.


Arizona


Last Thursday, the Court of Appeals upheld limits on PTSD recommendations. The state court of appeals ruled that the Department of Health Services was acting legally when it decided that doctors could only recommend medical marijuana for "palliative care" for PTSD. The department argued there was no evidence showing marijuana could actually cure people of PTSD. The department also limited recommendations to people who were already being treated for PTSD. An Arizona medical marijuana nurses group filed suit against the restrictions, but now the court has ruled against them.


Arkansas


Last Wednesday, a bill to ban edibles and public smoking won a committee vote. A bill that would bar medical marijuana patients from consuming edibles or from smoking their medicine in public was approved by the House Rules Committee. But the measure, House Bill 1400, faces an uphill battle to win final approval because any changes to the voter-approved medical marijuana law require a two-thirds vote to pass.

Last Friday, the bill passed the House. The House voted to approve House Bill 1400, which would prohibit the smoking of medical marijuana anywhere tobacco smoking is prohibited. The bill passed 88-0. Under the bill, knowingly smoking medical marijuana in the presence of a pregnant woman would be prohibited. The measure also prohibits those under 21 from smoking medical marijuana. A bill that would have banned smoking medical marijuana at all has already died in the Senate.

On Monday, the House killed a bill banning edibles. The House voted 52-40 to kill House Bill 1991, which would have banned the commercial production of medical marijuana edibles in the state. Bill sponsor Rep. Robin Lundstrum (R-Springdale) argued that patients could make their own and that medical marijuana is medicine, not candy, but her arguments failed to sway her peers.


Georgia


Last Thursday, url=http://www.ajc.com/news/state--regional ... P9s712m6HJ]lawmakers reached a compromise on a CBD cannabis oil bill[/url]. Lawmakers appear to have reached an agreement that would add six illnesses and conditions to the state's list of qualifying medical conditions, allow the use of CBD cannabis oil in hospice care, and keep the allowable level of THC in cannabis oil at 5% or less. That means Senate Bill 16 should now be able to pass out of the House Human Services Committee and head for a House floor vote.


Massachusetts

Last Thursday, bills to protect patients' employment rights filed. Even as the state Supreme Court heard a case on employment rights for medical marijuana patients, two bills alive in the state legislature would do just that. Rep. Frank Smizik (D-Brookline) has introduced House Bill 2385, which would explicitlyprotect the rights of a medical marijuana patient to use the drug without facing discrimination in hiring, firing or terms of employment. The bill would also protect medical marijuana patients from discrimination in education, housing and child welfare and custody cases. That bill is currently before the Committee on Marijuana Policy. A similar bill was filed last sessions, but didn't pass. A second bill, House Bill 113, is aimed mostly at updating state law to bring it in line with the Americans With Disabilities Act, but one provision clarifies that employers cannot take adverse employment action against someone for using medical marijuana. That bill is before the Joint Committee on Children, Families, and Persons with Disabilities.


Nebraska

Last Wednesday, a medical marijuana bill got a charged hearing. At a hearing in the Judiciary Committee, law enforcement, the state attorney general's office, and the state's top doctor all came out in opposition to a medical marijuana bill, Legislative Bill 622, but legislators also heard emotional testimony in favor of the bill from Army veterans and others who said they would benefit from access to medical marijuana. Five of the bill's sponsors sit on the eight-member Judiciary Committee, so the bill is likely to make it to a House floor vote, where opposition has killed similar measures in past years.

Last Friday, the bill headed for a floor vote. The legislature's Judiciary Committee voted 6-1to advance Legislative Bill 622, which would bring medical marijuana to the Cornhusker state. The bill would authorize cultivation, manufacture, and distribution of medical marijuana products, but would ban smoking the herb or allowing patients to grow their own. The bill is opposed by Gov. Pete Ricketts (R), as well as the state's law enforcement establishment.


Nevada

On Monday, a bill was filed to let medical marijuana patients carry guns. State Sen. Kevin Atkinson (D-Las Vegas) filed Senate Bill 351. That measure would allow medical marijuana users to possess a firearm and a concealed carry permit. Current state law requires sheriffs to deny such permits for medical marijuana users.


New Hampshire

On Monday, a Senate committee approved the use of medical marijuana for Ehrlers-Danlos syndrome. The Senate Health, Human Services, and Elderly Committee has approved a bill that would add Ehlers-Danlos syndrome to the state's list of qualifying conditions for medical marijuana. The measure now heads for a Senate floor vote. If it passes there, the House will take it up.


New York

Last Thursday, the Health Department said New Yorkers suffering chronic pain will be able to use medical marijuana starting this week. After announcing in December that it planned to add chronic paid to its list of qualifying conditions for medical marijuana, the Health Department said patients could start getting recommendations for chronic pain beginning Wednesday. The department also announced that physicians' assistants can now recommend medical marijuana. “Improving patient access to medical marijuana continues to be one of our top priorities, as it has been since the launch of the program,” Health Commissioner Howard Zucker said in a statement. “These key enhancements further that goal."


North Dakota


On Tuesday, advocates threatened a lawsuit or new initiative in the face of legsialtive meddling. The head of the committee that ran the state's successful medical marijuana initiative campaign warned legislators that they could face a legal challenge or even another initiative campaign if they don't back away from changes contemplated in Senate Bill 2344, which has already passed the Senate. That measure bars patients and caregivers from growing their own plants and restricts the use of smoked medical marijuana to cases where a physician attests that no other form of marijuana would be effective. The comments came from Rilie Ray Morgan as he testified before the House Human Services Committee.


Tennessee

On Tuesday, a medical marijuana bill was prounounced dead. Rep. Jeremy Faison (R-Crosby) said that his medical marijuana bill, House Bill 495, is dead because senators were afraid to vote for it. "The Senate, bless their heart, are just scared to death of their voters," Faison said Tuesday after the House Health Committee shelved the bill and instead approved a non-binding marijuana-related resolution to study the issue over the summer.


Utah

On Tuesday, advocates announced plans for a 2018 initiative. Medical marijuana advocates are gearing up to try to put an initiative on the state's 2018 ballot. They said they would begin the process of signature gathering next month, and they cite promising polling. The state legislature has so far thwarted efforts to create a robust medical marijuana program.


Virginia


Last Thursday, the governor signed a bill legalizing pharmacy distribution of CBD and THC-A oil. Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) signed Senate Bill 1027 into law. The bill allows for companies to manufacture and provide CBD cannabis oil and THC-A oil for the treatment of epilepsy and provides for its distribution through pharmacies.


[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format,visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]


stopthedrugwar

User avatar
notsofasteddie
Posts: 5102
Joined: Fri 1st Jul 2011 07:05 pm
Location: S.E. USA

Re: Medical Marijuana Update

Post by notsofasteddie » Fri 31st Mar 2017 03:45 pm

Top Documentary Films: Medical Marijuana, Is It Really Medicine?





Published on Jul 7, 2015


Top Documentary Films: Medical Marijuana, Is It Really Medicine?


Medical marijuana is proved to have certain valuable medical properties, which are witnessed and documented. Just to name a few of them, there are: improvement in patients that suffer nausea and vomiting, raise of appetite in patients that undergo chemotherapy or suffer AIDS, it also reduces intraocular pressure and possesses general pain relieving properties. Some studies as well confirmed marijuana to have benefits for a vast range of medical conditions, from disseminate sclerosis to depression and similar conditions. Synthetic THC (THC is the main active component of marijuana) is also available as a prescription drug, known as Marinol.

Marijuana effectively helps in a wide range of medical conditions and diseases, including muscle spasms, glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, AIDS, HIV, diabetes, chronic pains, nausea, insomnia, seizure disorders, appetite loss, medium pains, spasticity, brain cancer, and lung cancer. Globally accepted by the medicinal society as an alternative treatment for patients, who suffer from a broad range of chronic diseases and medical conditions, medical has truly become one of a few treatments that are really effective. Of course, each patient has to first get a marijuana card.

Medical marijuana is most often used as an illegal substance or a recreational drug in other words, in a lot of developed nations. Medicinal researches have displayed that the THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) - marijuana's main active component - supplies essential medical benefits in a lot of patients. Voters of Arizona and California considered these benefits substantial and have approved regulations that allow the use of medical marijuana by any patient that has a medical marijuana card.

User avatar
notsofasteddie
Posts: 5102
Joined: Fri 1st Jul 2011 07:05 pm
Location: S.E. USA

Re: Medical Marijuana Update

Post by notsofasteddie » Fri 31st Mar 2017 04:10 pm

Medical Marijuana Update


by psmith,
March 29, 2017


Image


A new study suggests that medical marijuana can reduce opioid abuse, Arkansas and Florida continue to grapple with addressing voter-approved medical marijuana laws, and more.


National


On Monday, a new study found that legalized medical marijuana could help curb opiod abuse. A new study reported in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence finds that in states with medical marijuana, hospitalization rates for opioid pain pill dependence and abuse dropped by nearly a quarter (23%), while opioid overdose rates dropped by 13%. Researchers had expected to see an increase in marijuana-related visits. "Instead, medical marijuana laws may have reduced hospitalizations related to opioid pain relievers," said study author Yuyan Shi, a public health professor at the University of California, San Diego.


Arkansas


Last Thursday, the Senate passed two medical marijuana "fix" bills. The state Senate approved two bills aimed at modifying the state's voter-approved medical marijuana law. The Senate approved House Bill 1400, which would ban the smoking of marijuana anywhere tobacco smoking is banned. That bill now goes to the governor's desk. The Senate also approved Senate Bill 721, which would require dispensaries to appoint a pharmacist director who would be available for consultations with patients during hours the dispensary is open. That bill now heads to the House.


Colorado


Last Wednesday, the patient plant limit rose to 24 as a bill limiting home grows advanced. A bill aimed at limiting marijuana home grows has been amended -- again -- in the House Judiciary Committee. In a Wednesday vote, the committee approved raising the plant limit under House Bill 1220 to 24 plants. The bill had originally set the number at 12, but lawmakers then upped the count to 16, and now 24 -- if patients register with the state. The bill now heads for a House floor vote.


Florida


On Tuesday, a restrictive medical marijuana bill advanced. While a half-dozen competing measures aim to address the state's voter-approved medical marijuana system, the most restrictive measure advanced in the House on Tuesday. House Bill 1397 would limit growers to the seven currently permitted and bans smoking, vaping, and edibles. It moved out of the Health Quality Subcommittee on a 14-1 vote, but faces two more committee votes before heading for the House floor. None of the five Senate bills addressing medical marijuana have yet had a hearing.


Georgia


On Tuesday, a CBD cannabis oil expansion bill passed the House. The House voted 167-4 Tuesday to approve Senate Bill 16, which would add six new qualifying conditions for the use of cannabis oil, including autism, AIDS, Tourette's Syndrome, and Alzheimer's. The state Senate approved the bill last month.


Maine

On Monday, a bill to make medical marijuana users eligible for organ transplans got a hearing. Legislators heard powerful testimony from patients removed from life-saving organ transplant lists because they used marijuana as they considered Legislative Document 764. The bill would targets the Maine Medical Center, the only transplant center in the state, whose transplant policy states that "use of prescribed or recreational marijuana by any route of administration is absolutely prohibited." No vote was taken, and the bill is scheduled for more hearings next month.


Oklahoma


On Monday, the state Supreme Court ruled the former attorney general wrongly changed initiative ballot question wording. Former state Attorney General Scott Pruitt (R), now head of the federal Environmental Protection Agency, changed the ballot title for a medical marijuana initiative in a way that would mislead voters. The original ballot question read: "A yes vote legalizes the licensed use, sale, and growth of marijuana in Oklahoma for medicinal purposes," but Pruitt changed that to: "This measure legalizes the licensed use, sale, and growth of marijuana in Oklahoma. There are no qualifying medical conditions identified." Now, the original language for the 2018 initiative has been restored.


West Virginia

Last Friday, a medical marijuana bill advanced. The Senate Health and Human Resources Committee voted to approve Senate Bill 386, the West Virginia Medical Cannabis Act. The bill would create a system of regulated cultivation sites and dispensaries and allow the use of medical marijuana by persons suffering from a list of qualifying conditions. The bill now heads to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]


stopthedrugwar

User avatar
notsofasteddie
Posts: 5102
Joined: Fri 1st Jul 2011 07:05 pm
Location: S.E. USA

Re: Medical Marijuana Update

Post by notsofasteddie » Sat 8th Apr 2017 03:14 pm

Medical Marijuana Update


by psmith,
April 05, 2017

Image

Arkansas' governor signs a package of medical marijuana regulation bills, a West Virginia medical marijuana bill is just a vote away from final passage, and more.


Arkansas

On Monday, the governor signed into law a dozen medical marijuana-related bills. Gov. Asa Hutchinson has signed into law a dozen bills aimed at regulating the state's voter-approved medical marijuana law. Bills that actually modified the law required a two-thirds majority in both houses of the legislature. For a complete list of the bills and what they do, click on the link.


Maryland


Last Wednesday, legislators proposed using marijuana to treat opioid addition. A House of Delegates committee has added "opioid use disorder" to the list of qualifying conditions for medical marijuana use. The bill was set to be heard by the House Friday.

On Tuesday, a bill to allow more license and increase diversity passed the House. The House of Delegates voted to approve House Bill 1443, which would allow five more licenses to grow and process medical marijuana. The bill is aimed at increasing minority participation in the developing industry, which the state's medical marijuana law explicitly calls for. "Passing this bill will show the country that this is not an issue that we're going lock African Americans and other minorities from participating in this business venture," bill cosponsor Del. Cheryl Glenn said before the House vote. "Less than 1% of the licenses held in the entire country are held by African Americans and other minorities. I'm very proud at the state of Maryland that we are passing this legislation. Nothing is perfect, but this is really moving us along the path of having a fair system in the state of Maryland."


West Virginia

Last Thursday, the House fast-tracked a medical marijuana bill. Less than a day after the Senate approved a full-fledged medical marijuana bill, Senate Bill 386, the House has put it on path to quick consideration. The bill passed the Senate Wednesday, and on Thursday, the House voted to allow the bill to skip consideration by committees there and proceed directly to House floor debate. The move came in response to constituent pressure. "Like every member of this body, I can't count the number of emails and phone calls I received on this subject today," said Del. Mike Pushkin, D-Kanawha.

On Monday, the House amended the medical marijuana bill. The state House on Monday amended the medical marijuana bill, Senate Bill 386, to bar its use in leaf form. Medicines from marijuana would have to be in patch, pill, or potion form. Opponents of the amendment said it drastically changed the nature of the bill already approved in the Senate and worried that the Senate would not accept the changes, leaving patients in the lurch for another year. The bill must now have a final House floor vote, and then any differences will have to either be approved by the Senate or settled in a joint conference committee.

On Tuesday, the House approved the amended medical marijuana bill. The House voted to approve Senate Bill 386, which would establish a medical marijuana system in the state. The Senate passed the measure last week, but since it was amended in the House, reconciliation or a conference committee agreement must occur before it can head to the governor's desk.


[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]


stopthedrugwar

User avatar
notsofasteddie
Posts: 5102
Joined: Fri 1st Jul 2011 07:05 pm
Location: S.E. USA

Re: Medical Marijuana Update

Post by notsofasteddie » Sat 15th Apr 2017 08:37 pm

Medical Marijuana Update


by psmith,
April 12, 2017

Image


West Virginia is poised to become the next medical marijuana state, New Mexico's GOP governor vetoes a bill that would have allowed medical marijuana for opioid addiction, Ohio takes another step toward getting its system up and running, and more.


Arizona

Last Thursday, the Court of Appeals struck down the criminal ban on possession of medical marijuana on college campuses. The state Court of Appeals ruled that even though colleges and universities can bar the possession of medical marijuana through administrative means, the state cannot make on-campus possession a criminal offense. The state's medical marijuana law barred its possession in prisons, schools, and on school buses, but the legislature in 2012 added college campuses to the list. Now, the appellate court has ruled the state couldn't do that. The case is Arizona v. Maestes.


Indiana


Last Friday, the legislature approved CBD cannabis oil bills. Both houses of the legislature have approved measures allowing for expanded access to CBD cannabis oil But Senate Bill 15 and House companion legislation now have differences in the percentages of chemicals allowed, so the bills must go to conference committee to hammer out the differences.


Montana

On Monday, the medical marijuana regulatory bill was dramatically amended, and advocates were unhappy. A bill aimed at setting up a new regulatory framework for medical marijuana in the state was radically overhauled in a House committee -- and supporters of the original measure are not pleased. The measure, Senate Bill 333, saw 20 amendments attached by the House Taxation Committee, including amendments that changed the taxing structure, before that committee sent it to the House floor. The bill has already passed the Senate, and if the bill passes the House, a conference committee will be necessary to try to reconcile the differences.


New Hampshire


On Tuesday, medical marijuana bills got a hearing. Measures that would add new qualifying medical conditions and allow patients to grow their plants got a hearing in the Senate Tuesday. The bills have already passed the House. No votes were taken, though.


New Mexico

Last Friday, the governor vetoed a bill that would have allowed opioid addicts to use medical marijuana. Gov. Susana Martinez (R) vetoed a measure that would have improved the state's medical marijuana last Friday. House Bill 527 would have allowed people diagnosed with an opioid use disorder to use medical marijuana. In her veto message, Martinez wrote that allowing people addicted to opioids to seek medical marijuana "will likely cause a rapid increase in program enrollment, which the program is currently unable to sustain." But critics called that reasoning bogus, noting that the state Health Department sets the number of licensed producers and the amount they can grow.


North Carolina

Last Tuesday, a full-fledged medical marijuana bill was filed. State Sens. Teresa Van Duyn (D) and Valerie Jean Fousher (D) filed Senate Bill 648. Under the bill, patients could possess up to 24 ounces of marijuana and grow up to 250 square feet of their own medicine. The bill would also establish a system of licensed cultivation centers and dispensaries. It has been referred to the Committee on Rules and Operations.


Ohio

Last Friday, the state announced it would start accepting grower applications in June. The state Department of Commerce will begin accepting applications for 24 medical marijuana grow licenses beginning in June, the department announced. Once licenses are awarded, holders will have nine months to meet all requirements. Application forms and instructions should be released in the next two to three weeks, the department said.


West Virginia


Last Thursday, the medical marijuana bill passed the legislature. The Mountaineer State is poised to become the 29th medical marijuana state after the legislature gave final approval to Senate Bill 386, sending the measure to the desk of Gov. Jim Justice (D). The bill would set up a dispensary system, but does not authorize patients to smoke marijuana or grow their own.


[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]


stopthedrugwar

User avatar
notsofasteddie
Posts: 5102
Joined: Fri 1st Jul 2011 07:05 pm
Location: S.E. USA

Re: Medical Marijuana Update

Post by notsofasteddie » Sun 23rd Apr 2017 12:54 am

Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,
April 19, 2017

Image


Arkansas and North Dakota lurch toward enacting their voter-approved medical marijuana laws, Oklahoma and Wisconsin see CBD cannabis oil bills signed into law, and more.


Arkansas

Last Tuesday, state regulators finalized the medical marijuana rules. The state Medical Marijuana Commission gave final approval to rules governing dispensaries and cultivation facilities. The rules must still be approved by the legislature, which has passed some legislation that appears to conflict with them. The legislature only has until May 8 to modify the rules or the state will be out of compliance with the Medical Marijuana Act, which is now part of the state constitution.


Iowa

On Tuesday, the Senate approved a bill to down-schedule marijuana. The state Senate voted to approve a bill that would reschedule marijuana under state law from Schedule I to Schedule II and allow the manufacture and distribution of medical marijuana products. The bill now heads to the House.


North Dakota

On Monday, the governor signed a medical marijuana regulation bill. Governor Doug Burgum (R) signed into law Senate Bill 2344, which imposes sweeping legislative modifications on the state's new voter-approved medical marijuana law. With the governor's signature on the bill, the state now expects to have its system up and running within 12 to 18 months.


Oklahoma
On Monday, the governor signed a CBD cannabis oil bill into law. Gov. Mary Fallin (R) signed into law House Bill 1559, which exempts CBD cannabis oil products from the state's definition of marijuana if they are approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration. No such medicines have been approved by the FDA. The move is the latest baby step toward actually approving the use of CBD cannabis oil; last year, Fallin signed a bill that allowed clinical trials by researchers to take place.


Wisconsin

On Monday, the governor signed a CBD cannabis oil bill into law. Gov. Scott Walker (R) signed into law Senate Bill 10, which would make it easier to acquire CBD cannabis oil. Two years ago, Walker signed a bill to allow the use of CBD in extremely limited cases, but the limits it contains are so restrictive that families and patients haven't been able to actually use CBD. This bill will ease those limits, allowing patients to possess CBD for any medical condition with an annual physician's approval.


[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]


stopthedrugwar

User avatar
notsofasteddie
Posts: 5102
Joined: Fri 1st Jul 2011 07:05 pm
Location: S.E. USA

Re: Medical Marijuana Update

Post by notsofasteddie » Sat 29th Apr 2017 02:37 pm

Medical Marijuana Update


by psmith,
April 26, 2017


Image


Open enrollment is now underway for Maryland patients, regulatory bills are advancing in Florida and Montana, and more.


Florida

On Monday, a marijuana regulation bill won a House committee vote. The House Health and Human Services Committee approved House Bill 1397, which aims to regulate the state's voter-approved medical marijuana system. Critics call the House bill too restrictive and are calling on legislators to instead support a rival bill in the Senate.


Iowa

Last Saturday, the legislature approved a last-minute CBD expansion bill. In the space of four hours early last Saturday, the legislature saw a CBD cannabis oil bill introduced, considered, and approved by both houses. The bill would allow a sunsetted CBD law to continue to be in effect.


Maryland

On Monday, the state began open enrollment for patients. People who want to register as medical marijuana patients can now do so, the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission has announced. The commission has further information at its website, mmcc.maryland.gov.


Montana

On Monday, the House approved a medical marijuana regulatory bill. The House on Monday approved Senate Bill 333, which will set up a tax and regulatory structure for medical marijuana in the state. The Senate approved the bill, with amendments, last week, but the House now has to hold one more vote before sending the bill to the governor.


[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]


stopthedrugwar

User avatar
notsofasteddie
Posts: 5102
Joined: Fri 1st Jul 2011 07:05 pm
Location: S.E. USA

Re: Medical Marijuana Update

Post by notsofasteddie » Wed 3rd May 2017 10:41 pm

Congress Will Give the DOJ Exactly Zero Dollars to Go After Medical Marijuana


By Phillip Smith / AlterNet
May 2, 2017


Image
Photo Credit: Shutterstock / Teri Virbickis


Attorney General Sessions may not like weed, but Congress isn't going to let him spend any federal dollars to bust patients and suppliers.

The bipartisan congressional budget agreement to keep the federal government operating through September contains exactly no money for the Justice Department to wage war on medical marijuana in states where it is legal. The agreement reached Sunday instead explicitly bars the use of federal funds to go after medical marijuana.

And it sends a strong message to Attorney General Jeff Sessions, an avowed foe of marijuana and loosening marijuana laws, who told reporters in a February Justice Department briefing that while states "can pass the laws they choose," it remains "a violation of federal law to distribute marijuana throughout any place in the United States, whether a state legalizes it or not."

The budget agreement eliminated funding for medical marijuana enforcement by adopting the language of an amendment that has been successfully used since 2014 to keep the feds out of medical marijuana states. Known originally as the Hinchey-Rohrabacher amendment and now as the Farr-Rohrabacher amendment, the measure bars the Justice Department from spending money to prevent states from "implementing their own laws that authorize the use, distribution, possession, or cultivation of medical marijuana."

The move was greeted with studied approval by medical marijuana supporters, who are now calling for marijuana to be removed from the Controlled Substances Act.

"Medical marijuana patients and the businesses that support them now have a measure of certainty," said Oregon U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), a founding member of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus. "But this annual challenge must end. We need permanent protections for state-legal medical marijuana programs, as well as adult-use."

It is time to "amend federal law in a manner that comports with the available science, public opinion, and with America’s rapidly changing cultural and legal landscape," agreed Justin Strekal, political director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML).

The best way to do that, Strekal said, is "removing cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act so that states possess the flexibility to engage in their own marijuana regulatory policies how best they see fit."

Adding restrictive amendments to the Justice Department budget bill has served in recent years to block the feds from interfering in medical marijuana states, but is only a stop-gap measure. The amendments have to be renewed each fiscal year, and there is always a chance they could fail. That's why activists and the industry want the certainty that would be provided by either changing the federal marijuana laws or by making the funding ban permanent.

"Medical cannabis patients in the U.S. can rest easy knowing they won’t have to return to the black market to acquire their medicine," said Jeffrey Zucker of the marijuana business strategy firm Green Lion Partners. "Operators can relax a bit knowing their hard work isn’t for naught and their employees’ jobs are safe."

But only until September—and that's why it's not quite time to get comfortable, he said.

"While this is great as a continuing step, it’s important for activists and the industry to remain vigilant and getting cannabis federally unscheduled and truly ending the prohibition of this medicinal plant," Zucker said.

In the meantime, medical marijuana is protected in the 29 states where it is legal. But adult-use legal marijuana, legal in eight states, is not under the purview of the budget agreement and is still theoretically at risk from a Sessions Justice Department.

But even Sessions, a fire-breathing foe of the weed, increasingly seems disinclined to make good on earlier vows to go after legal weed. Like Donald Trump discovering that health care reform is "complicated," Jeff Sessions is apparently coming to understand, as he reportedly told Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper’s chief of staff last week, that the Obama administraion's laissez-faire approach to state-legal pot is "not too far from good policy."


AlterNet

User avatar
notsofasteddie
Posts: 5102
Joined: Fri 1st Jul 2011 07:05 pm
Location: S.E. USA

Re: Medical Marijuana Update

Post by notsofasteddie » Sat 6th May 2017 02:06 pm

Medical Marijuana Update


by psmith,
May 03, 2017


Image


Congress refuses to fund anti-marijuana federal enforcement efforts in medical marijuana states, Arkansas and Florida continue grappling with establishing regulations for their new programs, California rolls out its medical marijuana regulations, and more.


National

On Sunday, Congress rolled out an interim budget with no funding for medical marijuana enforcement. The budget bill crafted by Congress to keep the federal government working in the short term includes the Farr-Rohrabacher amendment language barring the spending of federal dollars to enforce federal pot prohibition in states that have legalized medical marijuana. The language is only good through September, though.

On Monday, a federal CBD bill was filed. US Rep. Scott Perry (R-PA) on Monday filed House Resolution 2273, which would amend the Controlled Substances Act to exclude cannabidiol (CBD) and CBD-rich plants from the definition of marijuana. It's been referred to the House Judiciary, Financial Services, and Energy and Commerce committees.


Arkansas

Last Thursday, Arkansas regulators gave final approval for proposed medical marijuana rules. The state's Board of Health gave final approval for rules governing who gets to grow and sell medical marijuana. But the rules must still survive a review by lawmakers, which will study them in a special session that began on Monday. The Arkansas Medical Marijuana Amendment requires the rules to be in place by May 8, or the state will be violating the state constitution.


California

Last Friday, the state issued medical marijuana regulation draft rules. A trio of state agencies released 114 pages of draft rules designed to regulate the state's massive medical marijuana industry. Now there is a 45-day public comment period before the rules become law. Click on the link for more details.


Florida

Last Friday, Florida legislators edged closer toward agreement on medical marijuana regulations. The House modified its medical marijuana regulation bill, House Bill 1397, to make it more palatable to patients and the state Senate. The bill was amended to do away with a 90-day waiting requirement for and to allow the use of vaporizing and edibles. The House also backed away from requiring doctors to recertify patients every three months. But the House and Senate remain divided on how many operations should be added to the state's seven "dispensing organization," with Senate Bill 406 added five licenses, while the House bill only adds one. Legislators have only until Friday to get it done; the session ends then.

On Tuesday, the House passed the medical marijuana regulation bill. The House approved a medical marijuana regulation measure, House Bill 1397, after altering several provisions opposed by patients and the industry. The measure removes the ban on using low-THC marijuana products in public, increases the number of dispensaries to 17 statewide, and allows patients to only have to see a doctor once every seven months to get renewed. The bill now goes to the Senate.


Vermont

Last Thursday, a medical marijuana expansion bill won a committee vote. The House Human Services Committee approved a medical marijuana expansion bill, Senate Bill 16, which adds Crohn's disease, Parkinson's disease, and PTSD to the list of qualifying condition. The bill has already passed the Senate and now awaits a House floor vote, but differences between what the Senate approved and what the House approved mean a conference committee is likely necessary to reconcile the two measures.


[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]


stopthedrugwar

User avatar
notsofasteddie
Posts: 5102
Joined: Fri 1st Jul 2011 07:05 pm
Location: S.E. USA

Re: Medical Marijuana Update

Post by notsofasteddie » Sun 14th May 2017 01:16 pm

Medical Marijuana Update


by psmith,
May 10, 2017


Image


Trump makes ominous noises about ignoring congressional mandates protecting medical marijuana states, Florida fails to complete medical marijuana implementation legislation, and more.


National


Last Friday, Trump threatened to ignore congressional protections for medical marijuana. Congress moved to protect medical marijuana by including in its stopgap federal spending bill a provision barring the Justice Department from using federal funds to go after the drug in states where medical marijuana is legal, but now, President Trump says that doesn't matter. Even though Trump signed the spending bill into law last Friday, he included a signing statement objecting to numerous provisions in the bill -- including the ban on funds to block the implementation of medical marijuana laws in those states. The president seemed to imply that he could ignore the provision and go after the 29 states, the District of Columbia, and the territories of Guam and Puerto Rico where medical marijuana use is allowed. "Division B, section 537 provides that the Department of Justice may not use any funds to prevent implementation of medical marijuana laws by various States and territories," Trump noted in the signing statement. "I will treat this provision consistently with my constitutional responsibility to take care that the laws be faithfully executed."


Colorado


Last Monday, the legislature approved adding PTSD as a qualifying condition. A bill to "Allow Medical Marijuana Use for Stress Disorders," Senate Bill 17, was sent to the governor's desk after the Senate last week approved a final concurrence vote to amendments accepted in the House. Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) is expected to sign it.


Florida

Last Thursday, the Senate approved an amended House medical marijuana bill. The Senate gave its okay to a heavily-amended House Bill 1397, sending the measure back to the House for final approval. Senate bill sponsor Sen. Rob Bradley (R-Fleming) offered and the Senate approved a "delete all" amendment basically replacing the House text. Among the changes: limiting growers to five retail facilities, allowing the Health Department to grant 10 new licenses this year, and a provision to add five more licenses for every 75,000 patients. The legislative session ends on Monday, so the House must act quickly.

On Monday, the legislature adjourned with no medical marijuana bill approved. Legislators were unable to agree on how to regulate the state's nascent medical marijuana industry, with the Senate refusing to hear a new proposal from the House on the last day of the legislative sessions, effectively killing the bill. That means it will now be up to the state Department of Health to craft rules and regulations for the industry. It also means that any rules -- such as a proposed ban on smoking medical marijuana -- will be easier to challenge in court than if they had been passed by the legislature.


Georgia


On Tuesday, the governor signed a CBD cannabis oil expansion bill. Gov. Nathan Deal (R) signed into law Senate Bill 16, which expands the number of qualifying conditions for the use of low-THC cannabis oil and allows patients in hospice care to possess it. The new qualifying conditions are AIDS, Alzheimer's disease, autism, epidermolysis bullosa, peripheral neuropathy and Tourette's syndrome.


New York


Last Tuesday, the Assembly approved adding PTSD as a qualifying condition. The Assembly voted overwhelmingly to approve Assembly Bill 7006, sponsored by Health Committee Chairman Dick Gottfried (D-Manhattan), which would add PTSD to the state's list of qualifying conditions for medical marijuana. The bill now heads to the Senate.


South Carolina


On Monday, medical marijuana bills died. Bills allowing for medical marijuana are dead this session. Identical bills filed in the House and Senate went basically nowhere, with the House version stuck in the Medical Committee and the Senate version still stuck in a subcommittee.


Texas

Last Friday, a medical marijuana bill advanced. Last Friday, the House Committee on Public Health approved a medical marijuana bill, House Bill 2107. The bill expands a 2015 law by increasing the number of medical conditions that qualify for medical marijuana use. The bill now goes to the Calendars Committee, which will decide whether to take it to a House floor vote. Bills must pass the House by this Thursday or they're dead.

On Tuesday, the marijuana bill died. Despite the strongest support yet in Austin, the fight to pass a medical marijuana bill is over. House Bill 2107 is dead, killed by the House Calendars Committee, which failed to take action on it before a Thursday deadline.


[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]


stopthedrugwar

User avatar
notsofasteddie
Posts: 5102
Joined: Fri 1st Jul 2011 07:05 pm
Location: S.E. USA

Re: Medical Marijuana Update

Post by notsofasteddie » Sat 20th May 2017 01:26 pm

Medical Marijuana Update


by psmith,
May 17, 2017


Image


Iowa sees an expansion of its CBD cannabis oil law, a Delaware medical marijuana expansion bill stalls, Florida remains without medical marijuana regulations after the legislature couldn't get its act together, and more.


Delaware


On Tuesday, the medical marijuana expansion bill stalled for lack of support. A bill that would have expanded the list of qualifying conditions for medical marijuana stalled in the Senate Tuesday as lawmakers complained that a promised amendment to address concerns of the medical profession was never added. But sponsor Sen. Margaret Rose Henry (D-Wilmington) said Senate Bill 24 would be reintroduced at a later date. The bill would have added debilitating anxiety to the list of qualifying conditions and removed a requirement that a psychiatrist sign recommendations for people seeking medical marijuana for PTSD.


Florida

Last Thursday, calls grew for a special session to deal with medical marijuana. House Speaker Richard Corcoran has joined a growing number of people calling for a special legislative session to come up with rules for the state's voter-approved medical marijuana amendment. Senate President Joe Negron has also said the legislature should be responsible for crafting the rules. The session ended earlier last week without the legislature reaching agreement on how to regulate medical marijuana. If the legislature doesn't come back into session to deal with the issue, it will be left up to the state Health Department.


Iowa


Last Friday, the governor signed a CBD cannabis oil expansion bill. Gov. Terry Branstad (R) signed into law House File 524, which expands an existing law that allows people with certain conditions to use CBD cannabis oil, but did not allow for production or sale of the oil. The new law lets the state authorize up to two facilities to grow marijuana and produce cannabis oil to be sold in five state-approved dispensaries. It also expands the list of qualifying illnesses to include 15 chronic conditions.


Michigan


Last Thursday, a bill was filed to allow patients to transport their medicine. Rep. Peter Lucido (D-Macomb County) filed House Bill 4606, which would repeal a 2012 law making it illegal to transport marijuana unless it's in a container in the trunk of a vehicle. It's "ridiculous" that medical marijuana patients can't carry pot like any other prescription medication," Lucido said."It makes no sense to give out medical marijuana cards and force patients to put it in the trunk," he continued. "My God, it's not a gun -- being a lawyer, my law firm has taken on at least a dozen of these cases."


New Jersey


Last Friday, a review panel recommended adding chronic pain as a qualifying condition. The state Medical Marijuana Program Review Panel recommended that the Health Commissioner approve chronic pain related to a number of ailments as a qualifying condition for the use of medical marijuana. There will now be a 60-day comment period and a public hearing before the recommendations is finalized and sent to the commissioner.


[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]


stopthedrugwar

User avatar
notsofasteddie
Posts: 5102
Joined: Fri 1st Jul 2011 07:05 pm
Location: S.E. USA

Re: Medical Marijuana Update

Post by notsofasteddie » Sat 27th May 2017 03:01 pm

Medical Marijuana Update


by psmith,
May 24, 2017


Image


The nation's leading veterans organization wants the Trump administration to open up medical marijuana research for vets, Maryland regulators grant first medical marijuana business licenses, the Utah GOP rejects a resolution in support of medical marijuana, and more.


National

Last Thursday, the American Legion asked Trump to allow medical marijuana research for veterans. In a letter to the White House, the conservative veterans' group asked for a meeting with Trump son-in-law and key advisor Jared Kushner, "as we seek support from the president to clear the way for clinical research in the cutting edge areas of cannabinoid receptor research," the letter said. "We are not asking for it to be legalized," said Louis Celli, the national director of veterans affairs and rehabilitation for the American Legion. "There is overwhelming evidence that it has been beneficial for some vets. The difference is that it is not founded in federal research because it has been illegal."


Florida


On Tuesday, a judge backed issued two more medical marijuana licenses. Administrative Law Judge John Van Laningham ordered the state to issue two new licenses to medical marijuana operators. That would boost from seven to nine the number of entities licensed by the state to grow, process, and distribute marijuana to patients.


Maryland

Last Wednesday, regulators granted the first medical marijuana grow licenses. More than four years after the state approved medical marijuana, the state Medical Cannabis Commission voted unanimously to grant final approval to the first firm licensed to grow medical marijuana, ForwardGro in Anne Arundel County. "A new industry in Maryland has been launched," said Patrick Jameson, executive director of the commission. "They can start to grow immediately." Fifteen companies were granted preliminary licenses last year, but none of the others have been granted final approval yet.


Missouri

On Tuesday, the ACLU sued a library over its refusal to allow activists to meet there. The ACLU filed a lawsuit Tuesday against the Rolla Public Library charging that it refused to allow a local man to hold a meeting in one of its rooms because he advocates for legalizing medical marijuana. Randy Johnson of New Approach Missouri had sought the room for a training session for initiative signature gatherers, but was unconstitutionally discriminated against because of his political views, the ACLU said.


Rhode Island


On Tuesday, a judge ruled a local company discriminated against a medical marijuana user. A Superior Court judge ruled that the Darlington Fabrics Corporation had discriminated against a woman when she was denied an internship because she used medical marijuana to treat her migraine headaches. The company's action violated the state's Hawkins-Slater Medical Marijuana Act, which bars discrimination against registered medical marijuana users.


Utah

On Sunday, Republicans rejected a resolution supporting medical marijuana. At its annual convention over the weekend, the Utah Republican Party overwhelmingly rejected a resolution in support of medical marijuana, defeating it by a margin of 70% to 29%. The Republican-controlled legislature has refused to enact a full-fledged medical marijuana law, and now the state GOP has made it clear it intends to stick to its guns. Advocates could undertake an initiative campaign next year in the face of legislative indifference or hostility.


[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]


stopthedrugwar


User avatar
notsofasteddie
Posts: 5102
Joined: Fri 1st Jul 2011 07:05 pm
Location: S.E. USA

Re: Medical Marijuana Update

Post by notsofasteddie » Sat 3rd Jun 2017 01:55 pm

Medical Marijuana Update


by psmith,
May 31, 2017


Image


Dianne Feinstein and Chuck Grassley file a CBD research bill, Detroit has been moving against unpermitted dispensaries, and more.


National


Last Thursday, a pair of prohibitoinist senators filed a CBD research bill. Two of the Senate's most ardent prohibitionists, International Narcotics Control caucus leaders Sens. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and Chuck Grassley (R-IA) filed a bill to expand research into the medical benefits of cannabidiol and marijuana. The bill has not yet been assigned a number, nor is the text available on the congressional website, but the text can be viewed here. Feinstein authored a similar bill last session that went nowhere.


Arkansas

On Tuesday, state regulators delayed voting on final rules for another week. The state Medical Marijuana Commission needs another week to finalize some rules, commission Chairwoman Dr. Ronda Henry-Tillman said. If it indeed finalizes rules next week, applications for medical marijuana businesses will open up on June 30.


Michigan

As of Monday, Detroit has closed 167 unpermitted dispensaries, with more to come. The city's crackdown on illegally operating dispensaries has seen 167 of them shuttered since the campaign began last year, and another 51 are in line to be closed in coming weeks, according to Detroit corporation counsel Melvin Butch Hollowell. The city had identified 283 illegally operating dispensaries and has a goal of reducing the number of dispensaries in the city to 50.


[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, 'visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]


stopthedrugwar

Post Reply

Return to “Legalisation and Campaigning”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests